ACP: The Amazon Connect Podcast

11: After Deployment with Corey Miller, AWS

June 10, 2024 Tom Morgan Episode 11
11: After Deployment with Corey Miller, AWS
ACP: The Amazon Connect Podcast
More Info
ACP: The Amazon Connect Podcast
11: After Deployment with Corey Miller, AWS
Jun 10, 2024 Episode 11
Tom Morgan

Send us a Text Message.

In this episode of ACP, we were joined by Corey Miller, a Senior Engagement Manager at Amazon Web Services. Corey brings a unique perspective to the table with his extensive background, which includes a 28-year tenure in the United States Air Force as a military police officer and his subsequent transition into the technology sector, focusing on cloud services and customer experience solutions.

Corey shares insights into his role at AWS, emphasizing the importance of considering post-deployment operational support and the necessity of a holistic approach in technology implementation. He highlights his passion for enhancing the customer experience through technology, drawing parallels between his military leadership skills and his approach to technology consulting.

Corey's also brings his advice for those looking to enter the AWS ecosystem or enhance their skills in Amazon Connect, including leveraging AWS's skill-building resources and connecting with experienced professionals in the field.

This episode is packed with invaluable insights for anyone interested in or currently working within the Amazon Connect space, emphasizing continuous improvement, leadership, and the exciting possibilities of technology in transforming customer experiences.

Corey's blog post that was referenced in this episode is: Transforming contact center teams when using Amazon Connect | AWS Contact Center.

Find out more about CloudInteract at cloudinteract.io.

Show Notes Transcript

Send us a Text Message.

In this episode of ACP, we were joined by Corey Miller, a Senior Engagement Manager at Amazon Web Services. Corey brings a unique perspective to the table with his extensive background, which includes a 28-year tenure in the United States Air Force as a military police officer and his subsequent transition into the technology sector, focusing on cloud services and customer experience solutions.

Corey shares insights into his role at AWS, emphasizing the importance of considering post-deployment operational support and the necessity of a holistic approach in technology implementation. He highlights his passion for enhancing the customer experience through technology, drawing parallels between his military leadership skills and his approach to technology consulting.

Corey's also brings his advice for those looking to enter the AWS ecosystem or enhance their skills in Amazon Connect, including leveraging AWS's skill-building resources and connecting with experienced professionals in the field.

This episode is packed with invaluable insights for anyone interested in or currently working within the Amazon Connect space, emphasizing continuous improvement, leadership, and the exciting possibilities of technology in transforming customer experiences.

Corey's blog post that was referenced in this episode is: Transforming contact center teams when using Amazon Connect | AWS Contact Center.

Find out more about CloudInteract at cloudinteract.io.

Speaker:

Welcome to ACP, the Amazon Connect podcast. This is the show that focuses on Amazon Connect and related technologies. I'm your host, Tom Morgan, and I'm joined as usual by my co host, AWS Solution Architect and Contact Center Consultant, Alex Baker. We are also joined today by Corey Miller, Senior Engagement Manager at Amazon Web Services. Find out more about Cloud Interact by visiting us at cloudinteract.io.

Tom Morgan:

It's time for another episode of ACP and I'm here with Alex and I'm also here with Corey Miller, a senior engagement manager at Amazon Web Services. But before we get into who you are and what you do I had to send Alex just before we started recording. I found a live webcam of your beach, Corey, where you live and it looks beautiful. The sun is just coming up like the waves, the palm trees. I'm looking out the window right now. It's freezing cold here. It's horrible You are, you are living in a lovely place, my friend, and we are very jealous.

Alex Baker:

Yeah, we're, we're, we're British. So we kind of, we talk about the weather a lot. It's, just what we do.

Corey Miller:

Oh, I know, I live there.

Alex Baker:

Yeah.

Corey Miller:

England for three years, so I'm well aware of the weather.

Tom Morgan:

So we have traditional English weather today. But but how about you? So Corey, introduce yourself, please.

Corey Miller:

Oh, thank you very much. So my name is Corey Miller. I'm a senior engagement manager with Amazon Web Services. I've been in professional services the entire time I've been with the company, and this is really my first venture into professional consulting. Previously, I was I was actually in the United States Air Force prior to even

Tom Morgan:

Right. For, for 28 years, I believe.

Corey Miller:

28 years. Yes. I was, I was a military police officer. So in the, the air force we call, we're referred to as a security forces. And for the first, probably 10 to 12 years of that time, I was a traditional police officer that did traffic enforcement, checked ID cards at the gates things of that nature, providing public safety, and I was even at one point a desk Sergeant. So I worked in a 911. Contact center. So unbeknownst to me now where I'm at today, I have some contact center

Tom Morgan:

got some real world, real world knowledge of being an

Corey Miller:

real world knowledge back at, back in the day of working in a, an emergency operations type centers. So yeah, it was, it was

Tom Morgan:

That's interesting. That's interesting. And, and very much a people person. Centric job, I would imagine,

Corey Miller:

Absolutely. Yeah, it was. And, and I was fortunate enough to travel to, to be stationed in quite a few places, as I mentioned earlier, I was actually stationed in England. If you're familiar with the Norwich area, Bury St. Edmonds,

Tom Morgan:

very familiar, but that's where I live. That's where Alex lives actually.

Corey Miller:

live in Bury?

Tom Morgan:

No Norwich,

Corey Miller:

Oh, in the Norwich area Yeah. I was stationed over at at RAF Mildenhall for three years.

Tom Morgan:

no way.

Corey Miller:

yeah, and it's some of some of the best times we've had. My, my oldest daughter still likes to consider herself a British and she had some of the best time there. And we were looking forward to eventually getting back to the area. We still have some friends that live there.

Tom Morgan:

fantastic. Oh, well, you're very, very welcome to come visit. Absolutely. And it's, it's

Alex Baker:

for a pint when you're

Tom Morgan:

Yeah,

Corey Miller:

Absolutely. And if you get a

Tom Morgan:

these

Corey Miller:

come this way and we'll, we'll take you to the beach.

Tom Morgan:

There you go. That's perfect. Sounds good. So, so how did you go from. Special forces, US Air Force into security force. Not special forces, completely different. Sorry.

Corey Miller:

Yes. Yes. Very.

Tom Morgan:

How do you get from security forces in US Air Force into AWS? How did that trajectory happen?

Corey Miller:

So, so the actual start was I can go back to 2017. I was looking to get a master's degree in international studies and the student advisor talked to me and said, you know, you've got some experience working with Microsoft SharePoint. You like to work in in, in the technology space. Have you thought about getting your master's in computer science? And I said, not really, I've got a bachelor's in criminal justice. I really didn't think about the pivot and it was the smartest thing that I ever did. I got a master's in information security. So it's a computer science degree and I just fell in love with it. I fell in love with the idea of working in technology. So when it was time to retire, that was the space I wanted to get into, but I've been doing leadership roles. I, achieved a lot while I was in the military and I'd learned a lot, a lot of soft skills. Right. That we refer to the hard skills versus the soft skills trade. So I started looking online for some folks that I could relate to that were maybe doing something similar, but we're now had transitioned at the military. Amazon is a very large supporter of the military and you all probably have known that you've seen that it's global, it isn't just us military base. They support a lot of transitioning service members. So I contacted a fellow Amazonian by the name of Derek Fishback. He's also an engagement manager here at Amazon. I spoke with him and it just it struck me how he was able to be in the space where he could still lead people work on transforming the way that Folks look at technology and how it can improve their lives or improve their businesses, provide customer value. And at the same time, leadership principles that aligned a lot of what I like to do, which is number one, customer obsession. Like you noted earlier, it's very customer service base oriented. Positions I've been in. So I was fortunate enough to interview and was hired as a, as an engagement manager. And since then I've had seven different engagements, two of which have been Amazon connect and I absolutely fell in love with it. I, I really did. I realized through the Amazon Connect experience that I enjoy customer experience types of engagements because I like to put myself in the, in the feet of the customer, but at the same time, the shoes of the individual providing the service to try to meet in the middle where that's at.

Alex Baker:

Do you find that, so having been in the military for such a long time Amazon do, do, you know, will make a big thing of the leadership principles. Is that something that, that kind of is closely interrelated to your experience in the military with those, those leadership principles?

Corey Miller:

Well, it is. having guiding principles of any kind. Whether I'm sure at cloud interact, you all have this very something very similar. Having something that guides the way that you work that you can reflect on. If you ever doubt yourself in a situation or you find yourself in a situation with with a customer dive deep is another one. Have backbone to commit is another one. These are essential when you're leading an engagement, especially at the very beginning. When you're working with a customer who your job is to try to bring them the dream that they're looking for. And sometimes that means hard decisions and hard choices. So having leadership principles to lean on can really help guide you in those conversations.

Alex Baker:

Yeah. Makes sense. Thank you. So, and, and working in, working in the professional services in, in the, the AWS Prosser part of the business what does proser do compared to some of the other parts for, for those listeners that might not know and are there any sort of unique challenges of, of working in that part of the business?

Corey Miller:

So, as I mentioned, this is my very first foray into professional consulting. I didn't know what that really meant. I knew that I would lead teams and lead people, but I didn't realize the extent to which professional services works. We're a global organization. part of AWS. And there's so many different arms within within AWS. This is just one of them under the shared delivery side and under the sales side. Our job really is to meet with the customer and help them realize or understand how they can best best Deliver the solution that they're looking for. And this isn't something where in any of my engagement where I've went into and just said, okay, here, provide us the work or provide us what you want. We'll see you in, in, in two months, three months time. This is a continuous it's a relationship. It's agile principles. It's continuous communications. It's the ability to understand what your minimum viable product is. And in professional services, we're hired to go out and do that. We're hired because we have the expertise. We're hired because customers trust us and rely on us to be able to come to their workspaces and deliver exactly what they're looking for or exceed expectations.

Alex Baker:

Yeah. Thank you. That's really interesting. And in terms of what types of customers and what sizes of organizations to work with, I'd expect it's kind of pretty big organizations, right? That are going to need that level of, service.

Corey Miller:

So you would think, right? You would think, but I've had small, medium businesses. I've worked with businesses who this is their very first foray into the cloud and they're doing a specific job and they're looking for a specific resource and they're looking for a specific timeline. And so they know that if they can go to professional services, we've got a reputation. That we can deliver on what it is they're looking for. I've also worked with some of the largest companies that are on the globe today. We have references out to Panasonic, BMW, Hilton. these companies trust professional services and have trust professional services for, for years now.

Tom Morgan:

You wrote a blog post, which was the blog post that kind of first led us to you and led us to know what you were thinking around transforming contact centers using Amazon Connect, and we'll put a link to it in the show notes as well. But in that blog, you wrote in my experience, companies do not adequately prioritize post deployment operational support. Which really kind of caught our attention, I think, because yeah, I don't think anybody's talking about it. So, how, should companies be thinking about that day two and beyond once they've done an Amazon Connect rollout? Because I think there's a tendency, isn't there, to always, in your planning, the planning ends at the, the go live and, and that's it, right?

Corey Miller:

Absolutely. Okay. So, let's level set on, on that. The engagements that I've had, especially the last two for, for Amazon Connect, both of these were transformational engagements. Both of these were businesses who were using on premises contact center platforms. Right. So Tom, you're you're a coder by trade developer by trade, putting yourself in the shoes there versus Alex. If you were looking at it from the human experience for the transformational experience, the two of you come together. I see focus on Tom side where I see focusing on what's the spend going to be? What's the technology going to be for the replacement? What can we do for the customer that's going to to wow them, give them that wow factor? Are we going to introduce a natural language component like Lex? Are we going to try to improve the agent experience for them themselves with a different type of workspace? What I don't hear at the beginning of these, of these conversations is, do we have the right people in place to support this? Do they have the necessary skill sets? At the same time, do we have the right hierarchy and organizational structure going forward? Because right now, you're a customer to a provider. Going forward with Amazon Connect, as you both know, you now own this. You are the provider. It's no longer taking the requests and the requirements and putting it into the black box that was your previous provider, putting in a service ticket and saying, here's what I want. And then working with them through a paid source, you now own the development. You now own that product roadmap to be able to really put that together. And that is a, that is an absolute transformational change that needs to happen and it needs to be looked at from the top level of product ownership, all the way down to feature owners, all the way down to who's going to manage your day to day operations, how are you going to maintain your business units? If you have a multi business unit contact center, how are you going to then scale your services? Those are the type of things you have to think of along the same lines as you are. What type of technology are we going to introduce to achieve our goals? No,

Tom Morgan:

separating out. When we say roadmap, you, I don't think you mean like the Amazon connect roadmap of features. You mean this company's contact center, their roadmap. And like, and I think you advocate that the, the, the connect center of excellence inside an organization should have that roadmap. Do you think sometimes companies have got a little bit lazy, maybe with some of these like SAS solutions where. Like they kind of take it and these features happen to them and they roll out and they sort of appear versus them taking a bit more control over, this is what we want and this is what, how we're going to go and get it. And they kind of miss a little bit on that install upgrade step and thinking about what the changes might mean and stuff like that. Versus kind of the old, the old world. Yeah.

Corey Miller:

wouldn't use, I wouldn't use lazy. I would use the that I feel like the, the solutions are coming quickly. The changes are coming quickly.

Tom Morgan:

Overwhelmed maybe. Yeah.

Corey Miller:

You and you can become overwhelmed. Okay, I watch customers who are in the middle of developing and let's let's just take, for example, a business with 10 contact centers. So on a typical engagement, we're planning out from contact center one to contact center 10. The moment that you have put contact center one onto the platform, you are now a product owner. You're in development at the same time. So you've got multiple swim lanes. So while you have a development swim lane going on here, you now have a product that you have to manage. Well, Amazon Connect, as you both know, we're continuously putting out updates. We're continuously putting out changes, new products, generative AI integrations. If you're not prepared to intake those, your contact centers may be missing out. On new features, the current contact centers that you have, maybe looking at new features you're trying to introduce, or will you wondering, Hey, is this all we're going to have? Are we going to have something new if we are, where's the product roadmap? So me as a, a contact center manager and my technical lead, who's managing the contact center the technical requirements for that contact center can look at this and say, yeah, Hey, you know what? In three months, we're going to have the ability to record calls. We don't currently have that. Would we want that? Fantastic. Having that something as simple as a road map to your own success can help guide you in decisions, and it can also help you not feel as overwhelmed when Amazon Connect introduces a brand new service.

Tom Morgan:

Hmm.

Alex Baker:

It's a really good point that you know, in the, in the old world of sort of legacy contact centers, it was very much the opposite. Wasn't it? It's kind of the customer might actively have to go out and seek those, those new features or new services. Whereas with connect is that kind of steady trickle of. Yeah, it's an interesting

Corey Miller:

Well, and that is what happens when, when the majority of your services are now service provided from connect before. I can remember when I was a security forces desk sergeant and we had our telephones and it tells someone decided to buy a brand new telephone or new. That's what we had. It was hardware. It was hardware driven computer hardware driven. But now minimum requirements are needed. You're connecting through a service provider through SaaS. Next thing you know, we can iterate on top and you have to be prepared for those changes to come much quicker than it used to be.

Tom Morgan:

Yeah. That makes sense. Who should be involved in that roadmap discussion? That is that, I guess it's, is it it, is it support? Is it non technical folks? Is

Corey Miller:

every single person you just named. It is, it is a holistic approach. I, I am not a developer and, and Tom, obviously you are, Alex, you said at the beginning, you're not a developer. I'm probably a little more aligned to where Alex is. Where I have found success with the teaming concepts that we've used here at AWS Professional Services in Amazon Connect is I pair up a business analyst whose job it is to know the business themselves. If you put themselves, they've worked as an agent or they've worked as a supervisor. They know the pain points that they're feeling. In turn, they partner with the developer. The developer can take the designs. They can take the requirements. They can then build out that Amazon Connect initial IVR with the correct queues with correct business hours, get everything set up, and it's really a partnership. And that's just on the initial IVR level. If you're talking the overall contact center platform change. Product owners for your features. Do you, do you need to have a product owner for your natural language component? Is it, is it big enough to need that? Do you need to have a product owner for the equipment side to make sure that all of your contact centers have the correct equipment that's supported? Do they have the right headsets? Are they following along with the latest changes with AWS when it comes to Amazon connect usage? So it really is. It has to be a partnership. The business side may look at it from only the business side without realizing that the technology either needs to catch up or the technology needs to be tweaked. At the same time, the technology may look at it and say, we can introduce this, this feature would be great. Without realizing that the businesses said, I don't have the people, I don't have the capacity, I don't have the training to be able to take on that feature yet,

Tom Morgan:

I guess it's about leading. Based on the people and the requirements and that and not the technology, like the technology is, is important and it's important to understand it, but it shouldn't be the technology leading the discussion

Corey Miller:

no, and a lot of times, right, it it, the technology is what is focused on. You want to introduce the idea being that you want to give your customer the best experience possible. And with that, technology is key. But at the same time, the management of the agents, what can you give the agents to be able to, to help train them? What can you give the, the contact center support staff with the training to be able to support them? The next iteration of change that you want to introduce into the contact center. What the next iteration of improvements you want to introduce. So it said it's to kind of circle back. It is definitely a partnership.

Alex Baker:

I guess, if it's, if it's all, all done right, and those people considerations are done well, it gives the organization probably a lot more power to, to innovate at, at, at a much higher speed than before, you know, with, with, as we mentioned, that constant stream of sort of new services and features coming down the pipeline, if you're, if you're equipped for those, you can probably Do a lot more with your contact center than you ever could in the legacy environment.

Corey Miller:

Yeah, it's an input capability. You now have some way to, to take it in, to understand it, examine it from the business side of the technology side. Can we use this capability if we can't use this capability, but the business would like something like this, maybe we don't take what AWS is bringing in, but maybe we find a partner to in turn develop that capability for us. And there are room for partners. As you all know you guys are partners here in the in the Amazon partner network. If you just go out there and look, there's over 400 different partner offerings on our marketplace for partners to come in and and help them stand up their Amazon Connect contact center.

Tom Morgan:

absolutely. And, that decision making process you're talking about, I feel like is. Even more important with all this AI stuff as well. Yeah.

Corey Miller:

AI is it's on the tip of everybody's tongue.

Tom Morgan:

every CEO wants to have it like, because everybody else has got it, but it's yeah, like there's, there's putting it in and there's putting it in. Right. So I think all of that stuff you just said is hugely important for just day to day, the roadmap, the life of your content center for sure. But if you want to start somewhere and you're not doing that today, start it around AI. Because I think like understanding what AI is, what it can do, what it can't do. And it's, it's, you know, it's promises and its limitations, I think is super important.

Corey Miller:

Yeah, no, and you and you. Bring up a good point with, with generative AI. It is it's not something that I am a technical expert in obviously not my, not my role, but I do know some very smart people. I reached out to a, a friend of mine, Rob Pitfield. He's a principal. Architect here, solutions architect that specializes in connect, and he and I talked about it, and he gave it some thought on where is a I when it comes to connect and in his opinion, and I want to make sure that I capture his opinion correctly that A. I. Makes people even more important. Okay. It isn't making us less important, more important because you need the human experience to validate the information going in and in turn to validate the information coming out. The A. I. Piece is a fantastic assistant at the agent level. Amazon queue and connect as you, you both aware is a, is a huge change for us and it's a great tool for the agent to be able to use to comb through FAQs, to be able to provide them that right answer to save time. Well, if you're measuring average handle time and you're a contact center manager. And you introduce that now, all of a sudden, instead of saying, can I put you on hold a moment and two minutes and I come back, I've looked through all my, curated FAQ requirements and I've come back and give you an answer versus as we're talking as the conversations going, I'm getting curated information to me. If I can cut that down, even 30 seconds, even half that AHT reduces. That reduces cost. I mean, it's a phenomenal way to go about looking at your, at your business. But as he said, it's not a replacement. It's really, yeah, it's really just a good way to augment

Alex Baker:

It's really nice when we, one of our customers that we're talking to at the moment is really seeing it as a means to expand their business from what the agent base that they have, rather than a sort of, right, we can cut back on agents because we have gen AI it's,

Corey Miller:

Yes, that's a very good point.

Tom Morgan:

Yeah. I like to think of it as the Iron Man suit. Right. It's,

Corey Miller:

Oh, well, of course,

Tom Morgan:

It gives you all this stuff, but it's all it gives you all this stuff, but it's still there's still a you inside

Corey Miller:

Stark in the

Tom Morgan:

right. Right. Exactly.

Corey Miller:

No, that's a great way. That's a great way to look at it. I love the analogy. I'm going to have to steal that

Tom Morgan:

So,

Corey Miller:

talk to my customers.

Tom Morgan:

So I, I want to ask you something because like, you must have a unique perspective being You know, in the military for 28 years, and then coming into this world of business and IT and, and tech, my perception from, you know, the military projects there, I feel like probably run quite well, right? You make the plan, you execute the plan. How does business out here compare based on what you've seen, like, you've been in, like, the last two years of IT rollouts, are there things that. You think we could learn from the military.

Corey Miller:

Okay, so, and I thought maybe this question might come up simply just because of my background, I wasn't in IT rollouts as I've alluded to when I was in the Air Force, but I did run many, many projects. I was part of some, some very large multi year, multi billion dollar projects. The, the military side has a. A procurement requirement and a, at least on the, on the DOD department of defense here for the U S as a procurement requirement has federal laws, has financial requirements that they have to meet and maintain. And budgets aren't extended out through long periods of time. So there, there ran differently. if I were to put my hat on and go back 15 years, I would love to have watched some more agile. Project management take place to allow for a minimum viable products to be delivered some better communication with the customers. Unfortunately, that that's not the case. Okay. What I'll say is that from that would be the learning experience and I would have there. If I were to look at it here for the IT side to take anything from the military experience is the soft skills side that you get from leading a project in the military because we're treated as generalists if you're with a company. And say, for example, I don't have the right resources on my engagement. I can go back to a resource a resource manager, tell them I need a specific, I need someone with C code capability, and I need them for X amount of time. They can look in, if they don't have it, they can hire it. If I'm at a military base, we'll say our F. Milton Hall, and I've got a project. I only have the resources that I have available to me. They're not going to PCS, but permanent change of station. They're not going to move someone from the United States for a short period of time to complete a project. So we, we have a lot of generalists and we achieve a lot. When you have to do that, you have to develop the soft skills to be able to, to work around obstacles to get people motivated to come in and do work and to have a lot of skill sets that aren't a specific type. Right. So we can bring that to the, to the table. I guess those are really the only two things I would, I would say that that would compare to the two for what I'd like to, to see them both improve.

Tom Morgan:

That's really interesting. Thank you.

Corey Miller:

Sorry to, I hope it didn't burst your bubble on the way you thought about the Military RAN project.

Tom Morgan:

no, not at all. No, no, no. It's just interesting. Cause you don't often, I don't often get the chance to ask. So I thought I'd ask and, and just based on like. The role you do now and your sort of position within within AWS and Amazon, what advice would you give for somebody coming into this industry? That maybe they're just starting out with connect. Maybe they're working now part of a big organization and they're like, maybe they're working in support and they're, they're doing some kind of managing and looking after running a contact. So maybe they're in a contact center, but they're technically minded and they, you know, they want to make that jump and they kind of got big ambitions. Where should they go? What should they learn? What should they do?

Corey Miller:

Okay, so my first piece of advice is AWS Amazon skill builder has a phenomenal number of classes that are free classes to to enroll in. All right. There's one that's out there. Introduction to Amazon Connect and the Connect control panel. It's 45 minutes. It's free to enroll in. You can set up a free account. It's a great way to just introduce yourself into what the Amazon Connect Contact Center experience is. The next thing I would suggest is as you all both as you both know, working for a company that works with Amazon, we're all more than happy to reach out and talk about our experiences. And especially those of us who have worked with Amazon Connect. We're very, very proud of what it's done in the transformational space for contact centers. So I would say get on LinkedIn, find a someone with an Amazon Connect background from the technical side and also from the engagement side. From the engagement side, we get the opportunity to look at both worlds and see the business aspect of it and in turn be able to translate what the technical side really means. So I would say talk to both of them, both types of people. And then also become familiar with some of the services. You can go out to read some of the white papers. You can, you can go on to our websites and find any of the blogs that have to do with Lambda. which is an active service within Amazon Connect. Pinpoint for SMS services in Amazon Connect, Amazon Q within Connect itself. Those are also areas that I would suggest that people take a time to really educate themselves in. Biggest thing is just be open to learning. That's it.

Alex Baker:

it's almost like there's infinite stuff in there that you could just kind of be kept busy for the rest of your life.

Corey Miller:

Yeah, Alex, have you have you taken any of the recent skill builder classes? The one came out last year for building your own contact center. Have you gotten a chance to use it?

Alex Baker:

Yeah, I probably have. I feel like I've done quite a few of the connect ones and there's some great new gen AI ones as well recently.

Corey Miller:

so I took the opportunity a couple of weeks ago. I wanted to become even more familiar with connect. And I watched as the connect admin consoles become even more user friendly. Like I said, I'm not a coder by trade, but I get the concepts and I can read a design. And so I went out and there's a course that you can take. That is, basically, it's a three hour course that will teach you how to build a connect contact center. So I did. I built my own. So I went through it and, and follow the, follow along. Next thing you know, I've got a contact center, claim the number and I'm making phone calls and I'm answering from the agent. And so then I said, well, can I take it to the step further? And I went ahead and created one as if my mother in law, who's a wonderful cook, had her own restaurant. And I went ahead and put it together, had it front house, back house. It took me three hours. And I built a contact center and I gave my wife the number she called. Next thing you know, here's Polly reading off the text for the introduction to my, mother in law's restaurant. And she just looked at me. She's like, what is this? And I said, well, I, I am learning some new skills. So it really is a user friendly experience. If you want something just to very simply set up to kind of test. Yeah.

Alex Baker:

I've said this on a couple of the other podcasts, but that was probably the one thing that really made it really opened my eyes to pivoting towards AWS and Amazon connect. It was that the ease of which you can just as an individual set up a contact center and play with it and try all the new cool things.

Corey Miller:

Absolutely. Okay.

Tom Morgan:

around contact centers and the customer experience. So over to you.

Corey Miller:

Yeah, if you wouldn't mind. Like I said at the beginning, I am just humbled and honored to even be asked to be on a podcast like this. I've found myself really enjoying the journey down into the customer experience space, especially with Amazon Connect. It started with Naomi Hall. She is one of my mentors here at AWS. She. Really helped me understand what the connect center of excellence could be using the concept of continuous iteration and using the concepts of reading the reporting for analytics talking with your agents, making sure that you're updating your training in a in a cycle that is repeatable. And that can benefit everybody. Ash Seshadri, who is also here at AWS working with him and his team. Carl White Ramesh Natharajan Mehul Patel Amit Baga, Alicia Torres, Agnel Joseph. These are all fantastic people. folks that I have been working with and so lucky to work with in the past year plus on Amazon Connect. And hopefully on my further journey down the road, if I am lucky enough to be on another Amazon Connect engagement, then I'll get a chance to work with those fine people.

Tom Morgan:

Awesome. That's really cool. Like some of the the sort of team spirit of, of working inside the Amazon Connect team shines through there. So yeah, that's really nice

Corey Miller:

Yeah. You can, you can definitely tell I'm pretty happy. I'm really, really happy to be

Tom Morgan:

Absolutely. Oh, that's fantastic. Good. We could talk all day about this but it is time to bring this episode to an end. Thank you so much, Corey for your time. Yeah, Yeah. Thank you. Thank you as well, Alex. And thank you all for listening today. We discussed post deployment strategies, but ended up discussing so many other things as well with Corey Miller. Next time on ACP, we're going to be diving deep into AI and Amazon connect and all the different ways you can do that. So be sure to subscribe in your favorite podcast player. That way you won't miss it. Whilst you're there, we'd love it if you would rate and review us. And as a new podcast, if you have colleagues that you think would benefit from this content. Please let them know to find out more about how cloud interact can help you on your contact center journey, visit cloud interact. io. We're wrapping this call up now, and we'll connect with you next time.

Podcasts we love